Empowering Dreams

School Stories

Samar

“Some people form an impression about you based on one context they met you in and then deal with you accordingly. Sometimes, my whole personality is toned down to ‘cute, timid and mellow’ and some other times I’m misjudged as ‘crazy’ or may be ‘tough and self-reliant’. Those labels used to bother me at first. I felt that I constantly had to explain myself. But then I realized that what people think of me is really none of my business. I even realized that I sometimes fall into the same trap myself. So, I started giving people excuses. When I catch myself secretly judging someone I snap out of it. I remember that I do not have the right to treat someone based on an incomplete picture I have pained of them in my mind. People change as they navigate through life’s experiences. They learn new things about themselves as they try new things. So, why do we decide that we know other people? The truth is much bigger than our limited vision.”

 

Samar Raafat

School Supervisor at Educate Me Community School

Zahra

“Last year I enrolled in an entrepreneurship competition and I worked on my project so hard for so long, but I didn’t win. The experience, however, changed me. It even changed how I approached my job as a teacher. I learnt not to rush results and not to be attached to them.  I used to exert a great deal of effort in lesson preparation only to be disappointed at my kids when they didn’t show immediate signs of comprehension. I discovered later that impact doesn’t have to show that soon. We can start reaping some of the fruits the next year or even the one after that. Seeing how the kids were affected by last year’s teachers also made this clearer to me. So, I learned I got to do what I’ve got to do and give my all because at the end of the day I enjoy teaching and I believe it is my purpose. I don’t have to be attached to results because they will manifest themselves at their own pace.”

 

Zahra Ashraf

Mathematics Facilitator at Educate Me Community School

Hagar

“ The worst time of my life was when I dropped out of my old school and stayed at home for a long time. No other school wanted to take me afterwards because I was too old. I left my old school because they used to beat me. It made me hate education altogether. Dad doesn’t like to upset me, and that is why he agreed to let me stay at home. I learned a lot from this period of my life. I learned to never let go of something good I used to have. Getting an education is important, you know. But, maybe if I hadn’t left my old school, I wouldn’t have joined Educate Me.”

Ms. Safaa

“I applied for a job at Educate Me by coincidence when I learned that they were recruiting school facilitators as I was searching for a summer program for my kids.

I have always been a fan of arts and crafts and working at Educate Me Community School helped me develop my artistic skills. I get to practice them every day with my kids. My job as a facilitator led me to read more about psychology as well as child-rearing. What has been particularly interesting to me was reading about how to change the behavior of large groups of people and how to change their culture.

Being involved in the literacy program we used to have and dealing with parents in Talbeya exposed me to a new demographic of people most of whom may be resistant to change. But, I remember how proud of myself I used to feel when I saw a bit of change in them. If anything, I learned to be more patient. Changing people’s behavior takes so much time and effort.”

 

 

Professional Development Stories

Mr. Raga’ee

“The best two working years of my life were the ones I worked as an adjunct teacher at a special needs school in Fayoum. During those two years I learned what I hadn’t learned in my 31 years in education. I learned to practice patience. I learned the difference between a child with Down’s syndrome and an autistic child. I learned how to contain a child who has a cognitive and physical disability at the same time. I learned how to make them love me. I learned how to modify a child’s misbehavior and help them deal with those around them normally. I wanted to continue as a special needs teacher but our bureaucratic laws prevented me from renewing the position. I was qualified to become an expert in special needs education and I was filling a gap in that school which, to my knowledge, has so far not been filled. I wish for decentralization in education so we can start working freely and at full capacity.”

Mr. Raga’ee Abdel-Tawab

Principal of Beyahmo Mixed School

Sennorus – Fayoum

Mrs. Karam

“Elementary school children are attached to their mothers and they come to school looking for another Mama. If a child is met at school by an unloving teacher with a grim frown on her face, they will feel aversion towards her. But, if she makes them feel as close to her as they are to their own mothers, they will love coming to school. My mother died on the 23rd of April, 1997and I will never forget that date. Her passing taught me that this life is but a brief flicker. I was so attached to her and she was everything to me. But, thankfully, patience, faith, my children at home and at school all helped me get past my grieving phase. I learned to take my mother’s place. I am not a taker any more, I have become a giver. I want to sacrifice like she did… may God have mercy on her soul.”

Mrs. Karam Sayed

Class teacher at Beyahmo Mixed School

Sennorus- Fayoum

Mr. Mahmoud
Mr. Mahmoud Al-Dawy is not your typical public school headmaster. The principle of Nag’ Abu ‘Anan Primary School in Luxor does not settle. He views every step as a venture and is pretty fond of taking the unbeaten path. Why? Because he completely trusts in his team’s skills and abilities.
 
Mr. Mahmoud believes that 90% of his role towards his team lies in skill investment and encouraging self-development. He says that only 10% of a principle’s role should be devoted to routine management tasks.
 
Nag’ Abu ‘Anan School nestles snugly in the embrace of a rocky mountain far in a desert area. It might look a bit shabby on the outside and a little under-resourced, but the real strength of the school lies in its people.
 
If Mr. Mahmoud were a less ambitious principle, he wouldn’t have considered applying for the accreditation certificate to begin with .After all, the school is running and students are graduating. But, he saw real potential in his dream team of passionate and capable teachers.
 
The real achievement is not that Nag’ Abu ‘Anan actually managed to get accredited from the National Authority for Quality Assurance and Accreditation of Education. The real achievement is that the school staff members adopted their principle’s growth mindset. They too started working on their own self-development and on encouraging their students to invest in themselves and change the way they think.
Mrs. Atiyyat

 

“ If I exert effort, I can turn a child with learning difficulties into a genius. I need to look at their bright side instead of focusing on the dark side. Everybody has a bright side. It is my duty as a school principle and educationalist to dig deep into a child, a teacher or a staff member’ s potential and unearth their hidden gems.”

School Stories

Samar

“Some people form an impression about you based on one context they met you in and then deal with you accordingly. Sometimes, my whole personality is toned down to ‘cute, timid and mellow’ and some other times I’m misjudged as ‘crazy’ or may be ‘tough and self-reliant’. Those labels used to bother me at first. I felt that I constantly had to explain myself. But then I realized that what people think of me is really none of my business. I even realized that I sometimes fall into the same trap myself. So, I started giving people excuses. When I catch myself secretly judging someone I snap out of it. I remember that I do not have the right to treat someone based on an incomplete picture I have pained of them in my mind. People change as they navigate through life’s experiences. They learn new things about themselves as they try new things. So, why do we decide that we know other people? The truth is much bigger than our limited vision.”

 

Samar Raafat

School Supervisor at Educate Me Community School

Zahra

“Last year I enrolled in an entrepreneurship competition and I worked on my project so hard for so long, but I didn’t win. The experience, however, changed me. It even changed how I approached my job as a teacher. I learnt not to rush results and not to be attached to them.  I used to exert a great deal of effort in lesson preparation only to be disappointed at my kids when they didn’t show immediate signs of comprehension. I discovered later that impact doesn’t have to show that soon. We can start reaping some of the fruits the next year or even the one after that. Seeing how the kids were affected by last year’s teachers also made this clearer to me. So, I learned I got to do what I’ve got to do and give my all because at the end of the day I enjoy teaching and I believe it is my purpose. I don’t have to be attached to results because they will manifest themselves at their own pace.”

 

Zahra Ashraf

Mathematics Facilitator at Educate Me Community School

Hagar

“ The worst time of my life was when I dropped out of my old school and stayed at home for a long time. No other school wanted to take me afterwards because I was too old. I left my old school because they used to beat me. It made me hate education altogether. Dad doesn’t like to upset me, and that is why he agreed to let me stay at home. I learned a lot from this period of my life. I learned to never let go of something good I used to have. Getting an education is important, you know. But, maybe if I hadn’t left my old school, I wouldn’t have joined Educate Me.”

Ms. Safaa

“I applied for a job at Educate Me by coincidence when I learned that they were recruiting school facilitators as I was searching for a summer program for my kids.

I have always been a fan of arts and crafts and working at Educate Me Community School helped me develop my artistic skills. I get to practice them every day with my kids. My job as a facilitator led me to read more about psychology as well as child-rearing. What has been particularly interesting to me was reading about how to change the behavior of large groups of people and how to change their culture.

Being involved in the literacy program we used to have and dealing with parents in Talbeya exposed me to a new demographic of people most of whom may be resistant to change. But, I remember how proud of myself I used to feel when I saw a bit of change in them. If anything, I learned to be more patient. Changing people’s behavior takes so much time and effort.”

 

 

Professional Development Stories

Mr. Raga’ee

“The best two working years of my life were the ones I worked as an adjunct teacher at a special needs school in Fayoum. During those two years I learned what I hadn’t learned in my 31 years in education. I learned to practice patience. I learned the difference between a child with Down’s syndrome and an autistic child. I learned how to contain a child who has a cognitive and physical disability at the same time. I learned how to make them love me. I learned how to modify a child’s misbehavior and help them deal with those around them normally. I wanted to continue as a special needs teacher but our bureaucratic laws prevented me from renewing the position. I was qualified to become an expert in special needs education and I was filling a gap in that school which, to my knowledge, has so far not been filled. I wish for decentralization in education so we can start working freely and at full capacity.”

Mr. Raga’ee Abdel-Tawab

Principal of Beyahmo Mixed School

Sennorus – Fayoum

Mrs. Karam

“Elementary school children are attached to their mothers and they come to school looking for another Mama. If a child is met at school by an unloving teacher with a grim frown on her face, they will feel aversion towards her. But, if she makes them feel as close to her as they are to their own mothers, they will love coming to school. My mother died on the 23rd of April, 1997and I will never forget that date. Her passing taught me that this life is but a brief flicker. I was so attached to her and she was everything to me. But, thankfully, patience, faith, my children at home and at school all helped me get past my grieving phase. I learned to take my mother’s place. I am not a taker any more, I have become a giver. I want to sacrifice like she did… may God have mercy on her soul.”

Mrs. Karam Sayed

Class teacher at Beyahmo Mixed School

Sennorus- Fayoum

Mr. Mahmoud
Mr. Mahmoud Al-Dawy is not your typical public school headmaster. The principle of Nag’ Abu ‘Anan Primary School in Luxor does not settle. He views every step as a venture and is pretty fond of taking the unbeaten path. Why? Because he completely trusts in his team’s skills and abilities.
 
Mr. Mahmoud believes that 90% of his role towards his team lies in skill investment and encouraging self-development. He says that only 10% of a principle’s role should be devoted to routine management tasks.
 
Nag’ Abu ‘Anan School nestles snugly in the embrace of a rocky mountain far in a desert area. It might look a bit shabby on the outside and a little under-resourced, but the real strength of the school lies in its people.
 
If Mr. Mahmoud were a less ambitious principle, he wouldn’t have considered applying for the accreditation certificate to begin with .After all, the school is running and students are graduating. But, he saw real potential in his dream team of passionate and capable teachers.
 
The real achievement is not that Nag’ Abu ‘Anan actually managed to get accredited from the National Authority for Quality Assurance and Accreditation of Education. The real achievement is that the school staff members adopted their principle’s growth mindset. They too started working on their own self-development and on encouraging their students to invest in themselves and change the way they think.
Mrs. Atiyyat

 

“ If I exert effort, I can turn a child with learning difficulties into a genius. I need to look at their bright side instead of focusing on the dark side. Everybody has a bright side. It is my duty as a school principle and educationalist to dig deep into a child, a teacher or a staff member’ s potential and unearth their hidden gems.”